The Dreaded “M” Word: Marketing Plans

Marketing is like a first date—you put your best foot forward. But it takes planning.

NameBanner-smMarketing plans are essential sections of a strong nonfiction book proposal. But if you are a fiction writer these days having a marketing plan developed that shows your agent or editor what you can do to help sell your books and detailing your platform is one way of standing out from the crowd. Of course high quality writing is always number one, but once you’ve polished your manuscript so that it shines, it’s good to have a plan for reaching your readers.

You and I can work together to identify your audience and come up with ways to expand your spheres of influence. In a telephone conference, we can brainstorm ideas so you can prepare your own marketing plan section for your book proposal or you can hire me to write it for you. In either case, it all starts with a phone call.

FIRST STEPS
Book an introductory telephone consultation. The cost is $49 and includes:

  • A discussion about your book and the tools you presently have in place for marketing it, such as a website or social media accounts.
  • A copy of my article “The Dreaded ‘M’ Word: Marketing Your Books.”
  • A copy of my article “Becoming Super in Cyberspace.”
  • Setting a monthly budget and working schedule if you want me to prepare your plan.

Once I receive your consultation payment, I will send you an email to confirm and to schedule our call. If you have questions, please use my contact form.


ENDORSEMENT

Marketing Plans - Sandra JonasIn our highly competitive book world, authors must go the extra mile to grab the attention of an agent or publisher. Although novelists aren’t typically required to submit a proposal with a manuscript, they can set themselves apart by including a well-crafted marketing plan. Not only does this document demonstrate initiative, commitment, and business savvy (all necessary for today’s authors), but it also provides a road map for optimizing success before, during, and after a book’s release. By developing strategies ahead of time, debut writers can sidestep the panic and haphazard approach that often result after publication, when they discover they must do the bulk of the marketing themselves.

— Sandra Jonas, Founder and CEO of Sandra Jonas Publishing House